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Quick File Management with Gossa

Recently a family member needed to access some documents at a remote location that didn't support USB flash drives. Awkward to be sure, but I did some searching around and found a nice little solution that I thought I'd blog about here.

At first, I thought about setting up Filestash - but I discovered that only installation through Docker is officially supported (if it's written in Go, then shouldn't it end up as a single binary? What's Docker needed for?).

Docker might be great, but for a quick solution to an awkward issue I didn't really want to go to the trouble for installing Docker and figuring out all the awkward plumbing problems for the first time. It definitely appeared to me that it's better suited to a setup where you're already using Docker.

Anyway, I then discovered Gossa. It's also written in Go, and is basically a web interface that lets you upload, download, and rename files (click on a file or directory's icon to rename).

A screenshot of Gossa listing the contents of my CrossCode music folder. CrossCode is awesome, and you should totally go and play it - after finishing reading this post of course :P

Is it basic? Yep.

Do the icons look like something from 1995? Sure.

(Is that Times New Roman I spy? I hope not)

Does it do the job? Absolutely.

For what it is, it's solved my problem fabulously - and it's so easy to setup! First, I downloaded the binary from the latest release for my CPU architecture, and put it somewhere on disk:

curl -o gossa -L https://github.com/pldubouilh/gossa/releases/download/v0.0.8/gossa-linux-arm

chmod +x gossa
sudo chown root: gossa
sudo mv gossa /usr/local/bin/gossa;

Then, I created a systemd service file to launch Gossa with the right options:

[Unit]
Description=Gossa File Manager (syncthing)
After=syslog.target rsyslog.service network.target

[Service]
Type=simple
User=gossa
Group=gossa
WorkingDirectory=/path/to/dir
ExecStart=/usr/local/bin/gossa -h [::1] -p 5700 -prefix /gossa/ /path/to/directory/to/serve
Restart=always

StandardOutput=syslog
StandardError=syslog
SyslogIdentifier=gossa


[Install]
WantedBy=multi-user.target

_(Top tip! Use systemctl cat service_name to quickly see the service file definition for any given service)_

Here I start Gossa listening on the IPv6 local loopback address on port 5700, set the prefix to /gossa/ (I'm going to be reverse-proxying it later on using a subdirectory of a pre-existing subdomain), and send the standard output & error to syslog. Speaking of which, we should tell syslog what to do with the logs we send it. I put this in /etc/rsyslog.d/gossa.conf:

if $programname == 'gossa' then /var/log/gossa/gossa.log
if $programname == 'gossa' then stop

After that, I configured log rotate by putting this into /etc/logrotate.d/gossa:

/var/log/gossa/*.log {
    daily
    missingok
    rotate 14
    compress
    delaycompress
    notifempty
    create 0640 root adm
    postrotate
        invoke-rc.d rsyslog rotate >/dev/null
    endscript
}

Very similar to the configuration I used for RhinoReminds, which I blogged about here.

Lastly, I configured Nginx on the machine I'm running this on to reverse-proxy to Gossa:

server {

    # ....

    location /gossa {
        proxy_pass http://[::1]:5700;
    }

    # ....

}

I've configured authentication elsewhere in my Nginx server block to protect my installation against unauthorised access (and oyu probably should too). All that's left to do is start Gossa and reload Nginx:

sudo systemctl daemon-reload
sudo systemctl start gossa
# Check that Gossa is running
sudo systemctl status gossa

# Test the Nginx configuration file changes before reloading it
sudo nginx -t
sudo systemctl reload

Note that reloading Nginx is more efficient that restarting it, since it doesn't kill the process - only reload the configuration from disk. It doesn't matter here, but in a production environment that receives a high volume of traffic you it's a great way make configuration changes while avoid dropping client connections.

In your web browser, you should see something like the image at the top of this post.

Found this interesting? Got another quick solution to an otherwise awkward issue? Comment below!

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