Starbeamrainbowlabs

About

Hello!

I am a computer science student researcher who is doing a PhD at the University of Hull. My project title is Using Big Data and AI to dynamically predict flood risk.

I started out teaching myself about various web technologies, and then I managed to get a place at University, where I am now. I've previously done a degree (BSc Computer Science) and a Masters (MSc Computer Science with Security and Distributed Computing) at the University of Hull. I've done a year in industry too, which I found to be particuarly helpful in learning about the workplace and the world.

I currently know C# + Monogame / XNA (+ WPF), HTML5, CSS3, Javascript (ES7 + Node.js), PHP, C / C++ (mainly for Arduino), some Rust, and Python. Oh yeah, and I can use XSLT too.

I love to experiment and learn about new things on a regular basis. You can find some of the things that I've done in the labs and code sections of this website, or on GitHub (both in my personal time and for my PhD). My current big personal projects are Pepperminty Wiki, an entire wiki engine in a single file (the source code is spread across multiple files - don't worry!), and WorldEditAdditions. Nibriboard (a multi-user real-time infinite whiteboard), although the latter is in its very early stages. -->

I can also be found in a number of other different places around the web. I've compiled a list of the places that I can remember below.

I can be contacted at the email address webmaster at starbeamrainbowlabs dot com. Suggestions, bug reports and constructive criticism are always welcome.

For those looking for my GPG key, you can find it here. My key id is C2F7843F9ADF9FEE264ACB9CC1C6C0BB001E1725, and is uploaded to the public keyserver network, so you can download it with GPG like so: gpg --keyserver hkps://keyserver.ubuntu.com:443/ --recv-keys C2F7843F9ADF9FEE264ACB9CC1C6C0BB001E1725

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Latest Post

Mounting LVM partitions from the terminal on Linux

Hello there! Recently I found myself with the interesting task of mounting an LVM partition by hand. It wasn't completely straightforward and there was a bunch of guesswork involved, so I thought I'd document the process here.

For those who aren't aware, LVM stands for the Logical Volume Manager, and it's present on Linux system to make managing partitions easier. It can:

  • Move and resize partitions while they are still mounted
  • Span multiple disks

....but to my knowledge it doesn't have any redundancy (use Btrfs) or encryption (use LUKS) built in. It is commonly used to manage the partitions on your Linux desktop, as then you don't need to reboot it into a live Linux environment to fiddle with your partitions as much.

LVM works on a layered system. There are 3 layers to it:

  1. Physical Volumes: Normal physical partitions on the disk.
  2. Volume Groups: Groups of logical (LVM) partitions.
  3. Logical Volumes: LVM-managed partitions.

In summary, logical volumes are part of a volume group, which spans 1 or more physical disks.

With this in mind, first list the available physical volumes and their associated volume groups, and identify which is the one you want to mount:

sudo vgdisplay

Notice the VG Size in the output. Comparing it with the output of lsblk -o NAME,RO,SIZE,RM,TYPE,MOUNTPOINT,LABEL,VENDOR,MODEL can be helpful to identify which one is which.

I encountered a situation where I had 2 with the same name - one from my host system I was working on, and another from the target disk I was trying to mount. In my situation each disk had it's own volume group assigned to it, so I needed to rename one of the volumes.

To do this, take the value of the VG UUID field of the volume group you want to rename from the output of sudo vgdisplay above, and then rename it like this:

sudo vgrename SOME_ID NEW_NAME

...for example, I did this:

sudo vgrename 5o1LoG-jFdv-v1Xm-m0Ca-vYmt-D5Wf-9AAFLm examplename

With that done, we can now locate the logical volume we want to mount. Do this by listing the logical volumes in the volume group you're interested in:

sudo lvdisplay vg_name

Note down the name of the logical volume you want to mount. Now we just need to figure out where it is actually located in /dev so that we can mount it. Despite the LV Path field appearing to show us this, it's not actually correct - at least on my system.

Instead, list the contents of /dev/mapper:

ls /dev/mapper

You should see the name of the logical volume that you want to mount in the form volumegroup-logicalvolumename. Once found, you should be able to mount it like so:

sudo mount /dev/mapper/volumegroup-logicalvolumename path/to/directory

...replacing path/to/directory with the path to the (empty) directory you want to mount it to.

If you can't find it, then it is probably because you plugged the drive in question in after you booted up. In this case, it's probable that the volume group is not active. You can check this is the case or not like so:

sudo lvscan

If it isn't active, then you can activate it like this:

sudo lvchange -a y vg_name

...replacing vg_name with the name of the volume group you want to activate. Once done, you can then mount the logical volume as I mentioned above.

Once you are done, unmounting it is a case of reversing these steps. First, unmount the partition:

sudo umount path/to/mount_point

Then, disable the volume group again:

sudo lvchange -a n vg_name

Finally, flush any cached writes to disk, just in case:

sync

Now, you can unplug the device from your machine.

That wraps up this quick tutorial. If you spot any mistakes in this, please do leave a comment below and I'll correct it.


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