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Easy Paper Referencing and Research

For my Msc (Masters in Science) degree that I'm currently working towards, I'm having to do an increasing amount of research and 'official' referencing in my University's referencing style.

Unlike when I first started at University, however, by now I've developed a number of strategies to aid me in doing this referencing properly with minimal effort - and actually finding papers in the first place. To this end, I wanted to write a quick post on what I do for my own reference - and hopefully someone else will find it useful too (comment below!).

Although I really like using Markdown for writing blog posts and other documents, when I've got to do proper referencing I often end up using LaTeX instead. I first used LaTeX for my interim report in my final year of my undergraduate degree, and while I'm still looking for a decent renderer (I think I'm using TeX Live, and it's a pain), it's great for referencing because of BibTeX. With the template provided by my University, I can enter something like this:

@Misc{Techopedia2017,
    author = {{Techopedia Inc.}},
    year = {2017},
    title = {What is Hamming Distance? - Definition from Techopedia},
    howpublished = {Available online: \url{https://www.techopedia.com/definition/19723/hamming-distance} [Accessed 04/04/2019]}
}

...and it will automagically convert it into the right style according to the template my University has given me. Then I just reference it (\citep{Techopedia2017}), and I'm away!

For actually finding papers, I've been finding Google Scholar useful. It even has a button you can press that generates the BibTeX definition as shown above for you to paste into your references file!

Finally, I've just recently discovered Microsoft Academic. While I haven't used it too much yet, it seems to be a great alternative to Google Scholar. It's got a cool AI-based semantic search engine, and an interesting summary view of how a given paper relates to other papers to help you find more papers on a topic. It shows a papers references,the papers that cite that paper, and papers that it determines to be related - giving you plenty to choose from.

Using a combination of these approaches, I've been able to effectively focus on the finding and referencing papers, without getting bogged down too much with the semantics of how I should actually do the referencing itself.

Found this useful? Got another tip? Comment below!

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