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Change the way you think: Languages and Compilers in Review

Change the way you think.

I haven't seen it used recently, but when I first arrived at Hull University to start my degree, that's the phrase I saw on a number of posters about the place. I've been thinking about it a lot over the course of my degree - and I've found that it has rung true more than one. My understanding of programming has been transformed 3 times that I can count, and before I get to the Languages and Compilers review that this post is supposed to be about, I'd like to talk a little bit about that first.

The first time my understanding transformed was when I arrived in my first year. Up until that point, I'd been entirely self-taught - learning languages such as _GML_ and later Javascript. All of a sudden, I was introduced to the concept of _Object-Oriented Programming_, and suddenly I understood that by representing things as classes and objects, it was possible to build larger programs without having them fall apart because they were a nightmare to maintain.

Then, when I was finishing up my year in industry, my understanding was transformed again. I realised the value of the experienced I'd had while I was out on my year in industry - and they have not only shown me mechanisms by which a project can be effectively managed, but they have also given me a bit more of an idea what I'd like to do when I finish my degree.

Finally, I think that in Languages and Compilers is the third time I've changed the way I think about programming. It's transformed my understanding of how programming languages are built, how their compilers and interpreters work, why things are they way they are. It's also shown me that there's no best programming language - there only the best one for the task at hand.

With this in hand, it gives me the tools I need to pick up and understand a new language much more easily than I could before, by comparing it's features to the ones that I already know about. I've found a totally new way of looking at programming languages: looking at them not on their own, but how their lexical style and paradigms compare to those employed by other languages.

If you're considering whether a degree in Computer Science is worth it, I'd say that if you're serious about programming for a living, then the answer is a resounding yes.

Have your own thoughts to add about (your?) CS degree? Have a question? Post a comment below!

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