Starbeamrainbowlabs

Stardust
Blog


Archive

Mailing List Articles Atom Feed Comments Atom Feed Twitter

Tag Cloud

3d account algorithms announcement archives arduino artificial intelligence assembly async audio bash batch blog bookmarklet booting c sharp c++ challenge chrome os code codepen coding conundrums coding conundrums evolved command line compiling css dailyprogrammer debugging demystification distributed computing downtime embedded systems encryption es6 features event experiment external first impressions future game github github gist graphics hardware hardware meetup holiday html html5 html5 canvas interfaces internet io.js jabber javascript js bin labs learning library linux low level lua maintenance network networking node.js operating systems performance photos php pixelbot portable privacy programming problems project projects prolog protocol protocols pseudo 3d python reddit reference release releases resource review rust secrets security series list server software sorting source code control statistics svg technical terminal textures three thing game three.js tool tutorial tutorials twitter ubuntu university update updates upgrade version control visual web website windows windows 10 xmpp

Writing code when you don't have the time

As you've probably noticed, posts around here have slowed down recently. There's a reason: I've been very busy doing a year in industry. Currently, my goal is to release one post a week. While my time has been rather fragmented and at times extremely limited, I've still been able to sit down for a little while here and there to write some blog posts and some code (If I can actually pull it off, I've got a seriously cool project I'm going to post about on here in the near-ish future!).

Due in part to the fact that I really don't want to exclusively write code at my industrial placement, I've been trying my hardest to keep programming and playing around with things in my free time. It's not as easy as you might think. Sometimes, the setup and teardown time eats all the time I allocated away so can't actually get anything done.

If this sounds a little bit like your time at the moment, fear not! I have developed a technique or two I wanted to share on here, just in case someone else finds it useful :-)

Planning what it is that you want to do is really important. You probably know this already, but it is especially so if you don't have a ton of time to throw at a project, because otherwise you can easily spend longer figuring out what you need to do next than actually doing it. I try to break my projects down into small, manageable bite-sized chunks that I can tackle one at a time. Only have 1/2 an hour at a time? Break it down into portions that will take you about 1/2 an hour complete. It might take a while, but breaking your project down can help it go a little bit faster.

Even with breaking my project down, I often find myself forgetting where I got to last time. To tackle this, I've discovered that leaving a comment in the file I was last editing explaining in a sentence or two what I need to do next helps me figure it out faster. It's also really useful that my editor (whichever one I'm using at the time) is configured to remember the files I had open last - letting me quickly pick up where I left off. Monodevelop, Visual Studio, and Atom do this automatically - if your editor doesn't, there's bound to be a setting or an extension that does it for you.

By planning what I need to do next, and leaving myself short comments explaining what I was about to do next, I can increase the amount of time I spend actually writing code instead of fumbling around working out what I wanted to do next. It's certainly not an ideal way to program, but with practice you can get quite proficient at it....

Found this helpful? Got any tips yourself? Comment down below!

I've got some business cards!

My new business cards!

I've been to several events of various natures now (like the Hardware Meetup), and at each one I've found that a 'business card' or two would be really handy to give to people so that they can remember the address of this website.

After fiddling with the design over about a week I (and Mythdael!) came up with the design you see above. Personally, I'm really pleased with them, so I decided to post here to show them off :-)

I'm finding that it's a rather good idea to promote and build your brand at these kind of events by showing people the cool things that you've created and learnt, and business cards seem to be just the thing that helps you do it.

A close up of the front and back of my new business cards.

Portfolios are important

Attending the Game Development conference for students at Hull University gave me a little bit more of an idea as to what companies are looking for in perspective graduates (and more importantly interns in my case) that they are thinking of hiring. The thing that came across to me as the most important is the idea of an up to date portfolio. If you haven't come across one of these before, a portfolio is basically a showcase of everything that you've done, presented in a manner that is pleasing to the eye.

In my case my portfolio is my website, so I've just been spending half an hour or so updating it to reflect my current projects and accounts (I've opened an account on Codepen). You should do this too, and if you haven't got a portfolio set up, you can create one for free with Github Pages. If you're feeling particularly adventurous, you could also create a blog using Jekyll - Github pages supports this too, and it lets you create blog posts as markdown documents (like I do for this blog, although I wrote my blog engine myself), and it automatically transforms them into a blog post on your website for you. You can even use the Github web interface to do everything here!

If you comment below or get in touch with me in some other manner, I might feature a selection here on this blog.

Art by Mythdael