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systemquery, part 2: replay attack

Hey there! As promised I'll have my writeup about AAAI-22, but in the meantime I wanted to make a quick post about a replay attack I found in my systemquery encryption protocol, and how I fixed it. I commented quickly about this on the last post in this series, but I thought that it warranted a full blog post.

In this post, I'm going to explain the replay attack in question I discovered, how replay attacks work, and how I fixed the replay attack in question. It should be noted though that at this time my project systemquery is not being used in production (it's still under development), so there is no real-world impact to this particular bug. However, it can still serve as a useful reminder as to why implementing your own crypto / encryption protocols is a really bad idea.

As I explained in the first blog post in this series, the systemquery protocol is based on JSON messages. These messages are not just sent in the clear though (much though that would simplify things!), as I want to ensure they are encrypted with authenticated encryption. To this end, I have devised a 3 layer protocol:

Objects are stringified to JSON, before being encrypted (with a cryptographically secure random IV that's different for every message) and then finally packaged into what I call a framed transport - in essence a 4 byte unsigned integer which represents the length in bytes of the block of data that immediately follows.

The encryption algorithm itself is provided by tweetnacl's secretbox() function, which provides authenticated encryption. It's also been independently audited and has 16 million weekly downloads, so it should be a good choice here.

While this protocol I've devised looks secure at first glance, all is not as it seems. As I alluded to at the beginning of this post, it's vulnerable to a reply attack. This attack is perhaps best explained with the aid of a diagram:

Let's imagine that Alice has an open connection to Bob, and is sending some messages. To simplify things, we will only consider 1 direction - but remember that in reality such a connection is bidirectional.

Now let's assume that there's an attacker with the ability listen to our connection and insert bogus messages into our message stream. Since the messages are encrypted, our attacker can't read their contents - but they can copy and store messages and then insert them into the message stream at a later date.

When Bob receives a message, they will decrypt it and then parse the JSON message contained within. Should Bob receive a bogus copy of a message that Alice sent earlier, Bob will still be able to decrypt it as a normal message, and won't be able to tell it apart from a genuine message! Should our attacker figure out what a message's function is, they could do all kinds of unpleasant things.

Not to worry though, as there are multiple solutions to this problem:

  1. Include a timestamp in the message, which is then checked later
  2. Add a sequence counter to keep track of the ordering of messages

In my case, I've decided to go with the latter option here, as given that I'm using TCP I can guarantee that the order I receive messages in is the order in which I sent them. Let's take a look at what happens if we implement such a sequence counter:

When sending a message, Alice adds a sequence counter field that increments by 1 for each message sent. At the other end, Bob increments their sequence counter by 1 every time they receive a message. In this way, Bob can detect if our attacker attempts a replay attack, because the sequence number on the message they copied will be out of order.

To ensure there aren't any leaks here, should the sequence counter overflow (unlikely), we need to also re-exchange the session key that's used to encrypt messages. In doing so, we can avoid a situation where the sequence number has rolled over but the session key is the same, which would give an attacker an opportunity to replay a message.

With that, we can prevent replay attacks. The other thing worth mentioning here is that the sequence numbering needs to be done in both directions - so Alice and Bob will have both a read sequence number and a write sequence number which are incremented independently of one another whenever they receive and send a message respectively.

Conclusion

In this post, we've gone on a little bit of a tangent to explore replay attacks and how to mitigate them. In the next post in this series, I'd like to talk about the peer-to-peer swarming algorithm I've devised - both the parts thereof I've implemented, and those that I have yet to implement.

Sources and further reading

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