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NAS, Part 1: We need a bigger rocket

In my cluster series of posts, I've been talking about how I've built a Raspberry Pi-based cluster for running compute tasks (latest update: I've got Let's Encrypt working with the DNS-01 challenge, stay tuned for a post on that soon). Currently, this has been backed by a Raspberry Pi 3 with a 1TB WD PiDrive attached. This has a number of issues:

I see 2 ways of solving these issues:

  1. Building a clustered file system, with 1 3.5 inch drive per Pi (or Odroid HC2 perhaps)
  2. Building a more traditional monolithic NAS

Personally, my preference here is option #2, but unfortunately due to some architectural issues in my house (read: the wiring needs redoing by an electrician) I don't actually have access to the number of wall sockets I'd need to put together a clustered setup. If I get those issues sorted, I'll certainly take a look at upgrading - but for now I've decided that I'm going to put together a more traditional monolithic NAS (maybe it can become the backup device in future, who knows) as it will only require a single wall socket (the situation is complicated. Let's just move on).

To this end, I decided to start with a case and go from there. Noise is a big concern for me, so I chose the Fractal Design Node 804, as it has a number of key features:

From here, I picked the basic components for the system using PC Part Picker. I haven't actually built an amd64 system from scratch before - I use laptops as my main device (see my recent review of the PC Specialist Proteus VIII), and Raspberry Pis (and an awesome little 2nd hand Netgear GS116v2 switch) currently form the backbone of my server setup.

These components included:

For the storage there, in particular my (initial) plan is to use OpenZFS in RAIDZ mode, which has a minimum requirement of 3 drives. Using an online calculator suggests that with the above drives I'll have 8TB of usable capacity. Initial research does suggest though that expanding a ZFS storage pool may not be as easy as I thought it was (related, see also), so more research is definitely needed before I commit to a single filesystem / set of settings there.

I've heard of BTRFS too, but I've also heard of some stability and data loss issues too. That was several years ago though, so I'll be reviewing its suitability again before making a decision here.

In future posts, I'm going to talk about my experience assembling the build. I'm also going to look at how I eventually setup the filesystem (as of yet which filesystem I'll choose is still undecided). I'll also be running some tests on the setup to evaluate how well it performs and handles failure. Finally, I may make a bonus post in this series about the challenges I encounter migrating my existing (somewhat complicated) data storage setup to the new NAS I build.

Found this interesting? Got a suggestion? Comment below!

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