Starbeamrainbowlabs

Stardust
Blog


Archive

Mailing List Articles Atom Feed Comments Atom Feed Twitter Reddit Facebook

Tag Cloud

3d account algorithms android announcement architecture archives arduino artificial intelligence artix assembly async audio bash batch blog bookmarklet booting c sharp c++ challenge chrome os code codepen coding conundrums coding conundrums evolved command line compilers compiling compression css dailyprogrammer debugging demystification distributed computing documentation downtime electronics email embedded systems encryption es6 features event experiment external first impressions future game github github gist gitlab graphics hardware hardware meetup holiday holidays html html5 html5 canvas infrastructure interfaces internet io.js jabber javascript js bin labs learning library linux low level lua maintenance manjaro network networking nibriboard node.js operating systems performance photos php pixelbot portable privacy problem solving programming problems projects prolog protocol protocols pseudo 3d python reddit redis reference release releases resource review rust searching secrets security series list server software sorting source code control statistics storage svg technical terminal textures three thing game three.js tool tutorial tutorials twitter ubuntu university update updates upgrade version control virtual reality virtualisation visual web website windows windows 10 xmpp xslt

Routers: Essential, everywhere, and yet exasperatingly elusive

Now that I've finished my University work for the semester (though do have a few loose ends left to tie up), I've got some time on my hands to do a bunch of experimenting that I haven't had the time for earlier in the year.

In this case, it's been tracking down an HTTP router that I used a few years ago. I've experimented with a few now (find-my-way, micro-http-router, and rill) - but all of them few something wrong with them, or feel too opinionated for my taste.

I'm getting slightly ahead of myself though. What's this router you speak of, and why is it so important? Well, it call comes down to application design. When using PHP, you can, to some extent, split your application up by having multiple files (though I would recommend filtering everything through a master index.php). In Node.JS, which I've been playing around with again recently, that's not really possible.

A comparison of the way PHP and Node.JS applications are structured. See the explanation below.

Unlike PHP, which gets requests handed to it from a web server like Nginx via CGI (Common Gateway Interface), Node.JS is the server. You can set up your very own HTTP server listening on port 9898 like this:

import http from 'http';
const http_server = http.createServer((request, response) => {
    response.writeHead(200, {
        "x-custom-header": "yay"
    });
    response.end("Hello, world!");
}).listen(9898, () => console.log("Listening on pot 9898"));

This poses a problem. How do we know what the client requested? Well, there's the request object for that - and I'm sure you can guess what the response object is for - but the other question that remains is how to we figure out which bit of code to call to send the client the correct response?

That's where a request router comes in handy. They come in all shapes and sizes - ranging from a bare-bones router to a full-scale framework - but their basic function is the same: to route a client's request to the right place. For example, a router might work a little bit like this:

import http from 'http';
import Router from 'my-awesome-router-library';

// ....

const router = new Router();

router.get("/login", route_login);
router.put("/inbox/:username", route_user_inbox_put);

const http_server = http.createServer(router.handler()).listen(20202);

Pretty simple, right? This way, every route can lead to a different function, and each of those functions can be in a separate file! Very cool. It all makes for a nice and neat way to structure one's application, preventing any issues relating to any one file getting too big - whilst simultaneously keeping everything orderly and in its own place.

Except when you're picky like me and you can't find a router you like, of course. I've got some pretty specific requirements. For one, I want something flexible and unopinionated enough that I can do my own thing without it getting in the way. For another, I'd like first-class support for middleware.

What's middleware you ask? Well, I've only just discovered it recently, but I can already tell that's its a very powerful method of structuring more complex applications - and devastatingly dangerous if used incorrectly (the spaghetti is real).

Basically, the endpoint of a route might parse some data that a client has sent it, and maybe authenticate the request against a backend. Perhaps a specific environment needs to be set up in order for a request to be fulfilled.

While we could do these things in the end route, it would clutter up the code in the end route, and we'd likely have more boilerplate, parsing, and environment setup code than we have actual application logic! The solution here is middleware. Think of it as an onion, with the final route application logic in the middle, and the parsing, logging, and error handling code as the layers on the outside.

A diagram visualising an application with 3 layers of middleware: an error handler, a logger, and a data parser - with the application  logic in the middle. Arrows show that a request makes its way through these layers of middleware both on the way in, and the way out.

In order to reach the application logic at the centre, an incoming request must first make its way through all the layers of middleware that are in the way. Similarly, it must also churn through the layers of middleware in order to get out again. We could represent this in code like so:

// Middleware that runs for every request
router.use(middleware_error_handler);
router.use(middleware_request_logger);

// Decode all post data with middleware
// This won't run for GET / HEAD / PUT / etc. requests - only POST requests
router.post(middleware_decode_post_data);

// For GET requestsin under `/inbox`, run some middleware
router.get("/inbox", middleware_setup_user_area);

// Endpoint routes
// These function just like middleware too (i.e. we could
// pass the request through to another layer if we wanted
// to), but that don't lead anywhere else, so it's probably
// better if we keep them separate
router.get("/inbox/:username", route_user_inbox);
router.any("/honeypot", route_spambot_trap);

router.get("/login", route_display_login_page);
router.post("/login", route_do_login);

Quite a neat way of looking at it, right? Lets take a look at some example middleware for our fictional router:

async function middleware_catch_errors(context, next) {
    try {
        await next();
    } catch(error) {
        console.error(error.stack);
        context.response.writeHead(503, {
            "content-type": "text/plain"
        });
        // todo make this fancier
        context.response.end("Ouch! The server encountered an error and couldn't respond to your request. Please contact bob at bob@bobsrockets.com!");
    }
}

See that next() call there? That function call there causes the application to enter the next layer of middleware. We can have as many of these layers as we like - but don't go crazy! It'll cause you problems later whilst debugging.....

What I've shown here is actually very similar to the rill framework - it just has a bunch of extras tagged on that I don't like - along with some annoying limitations when it comes to defining routes.

To that end, I think I'll end up writing my own router, since none of the ones I've found will do the job just right. It kinda fits with the spirit of the project that this is for, too - teaching myself new things that I didn't know before.

If you're curious as to how a Node.JS application is going to fit in with a custom HTTP + WebSockets server written in C♯, then the answer is a user management panel. I'm not totally sure where this is going myself - I'll see where I end up! After all, with my track record, you're bound to find another post or three showing up on here again some time soon.

Until then, Goodnight!

Found this useful? Still got questions? Comment below!

Distributing work with Node.js

A graph of the data I generated by writing the scripts I talk about in this post. (Above: A pair of graphs generated with gnuplot from the data I crunched with the scripts I talk about in this blog post. Anti-aliased version - easier to pick details out [928.1 KiB])

I really like Node.js. For those not in the know, it's basically Javascript for servers - and it's brilliant at networking. Like really really good. Like C♯-beating good. Anyway, last week I had a 2-layer neural network that I wanted to simulate all the different combinations from 1-64 nodes in both layers for, as I wanted to generate a 3-dimensional surface graph of the error.

Since my neural network (which is also written in Node.js :P) has a command-line interface, I wrote a simple shell script to drive it in parallel, and set it going on a Raspberry Pi I have acting as a file server (it doesn't do much else most of the time). After doing some calculations, I determined that it would finish at 6:40am Thursday..... next week!

Of course, taking so long is no good at all if you need it done Thursday this week - so I set about writing a script that would parallelise it over the network. In the end I didn't actually include the data generated in my report for which I had the Thursday deadline, but it was a cool challenge nonetheless!

Server

To start with, I created a server script that would allocate work items, called nodecount-surface-server.js. The first job was to set things up and create a quick settings object and a work item generator:

#!/usr/bin/env node
// ^----| Shebang to make executing it on Linux easier

const http = require("http"); // We'll need this later

const settings = {
    port: 32000,
    min: 1,
    max: 64,
};
settings.start = [settings.min, settings.min];

function* work_items() {
    for(let a = settings.start[0]; a < settings.max; a++) {
        for(let b = settings.start[1]; b < settings.max; b++) {
            yield [a, b];
        }
    }
}

That function* is a generator. C♯ has them too - and they let a function return more than one item in an orderly fashion. In my case, it returns arrays of numbers which I use as the topology for my neural networks:

[1, 1]
[1, 2]
[1, 3]
[1, 4]
....

Next, I wrote the server itself. Since it was just a temporary script that was running on my local network, I didn't implement too many security measures - please bear this in mind if using or adapting it yourself!


function calculate_progress(work_item) {
    let i = (work_item[0]-1)*64 + (work_item[1]-1), max = settings.max * settings.max;
    return `${i} / ${max} ${(i/max*100).toFixed(2)}%`;
}

var work_generator = work_items();

const server = http.createServer((request, response) => {
    switch(request.method) {
        case "GET":
            let next = work_generator.next();
            let next_item = next.value;
            if(next.done)
                break;
            response.write(next_item.join("\t"));
            console.error(`[allocation] [${calculate_progress(next_item)}] ${next_item}`);
            break;
        case "POST":
            var body = "";
            request.on("data", (data) => body += data);
            request.on("end", () => {
                console.log(body);
                console.error(`[complete] ${body}`);
            })
            break;
    }
    response.end();
});
server.on("clientError", (error, socket) => {
    socket.end("HTTP/1.1 400 Bad Request");
});
server.listen(settings.port, () => { console.error(`Listening on ${settings.port}`); });

Basically, the server accepts 2 types of requests:

  • GET requests, which ask for work
  • POST requests, which respond with the results of a work item

In my case, I send out work items like this:

11  24

...and will be receiving work results like this:

11  24  0.2497276811644629

This means that I don't even need to keep track of which work item I'm receiving a result for! If I did though, I'd probably having some kind of ID-based system with a list of allocated work items which I could refer back to - and periodically iterate over to identify any items that got lost somewhere so I can add them to a reallocation queue.

With that, the server was complete. It outputs the completed work item results to the standard output, and progress information to the standard error. This allows me to invoke it like this:

node ./nodecount-surface-server.js >results.tsv

Worker

Very cool. A server isn't much good without an army of workers ready and waiting to tear through the work items it's serving at breakneck speed though - and that's where the worker comes in. I started writing it in much the same way I did the server:

#!/usr/bin/env node
// ^----| Another shebang, just like the server

const http = require("http"); // We'll need this to talk to the server later
const child_process = require("child_process"); // This is used to spawn the neural network subprocess

const settings = {
    server: { host: "172.16.230.58", port: 32000 },
    worker_command: "./network.js --epochs 1000 --learning-rate 0.2 --topology {topology} <datasets/acw-2-set-10.txt 2>/dev/null"
};

That worker_command there in the settings object is the command I used to execute the neural network, with a placeholder {topology} which we find-and-replace just before execution. Due to obvious reasons (no plagiarism thanks!) I can't release that script itself, but it's not necessary to understand how the distributed work item systme I've written works. It could just as well be any other command you like!

Next up is the work item executor itself. Since it obviously takes time to execute a work item (why else would I go to such lengths to process as many of them at once as possible :P), I take a callback as the 2nd argument (it's just like a delegate or Action in C♯):


function execute_item(data, callback) {
    let command = settings.worker_command.replace("{topology}", data.join(","));
    console.log(`[execute] ${command}`);
    let network_process = child_process.exec(command, (error, stdout, stderr) =>  {
        console.log(`[done] ${stdout.trim()}`);
        let result = stdout.trim().split(/\t|,/g);
        let payload = `${result[0]}\t${result[1]}\t${result[5]}`;

        let request = http.request({
            hostname: settings.server.host,
            port: settings.server.port,
            path: "/",
            method: "POST",
            headers: {
                "content-length": payload.length
            }
        }, (response) => {
            console.log(`[submitted] ${payload}`);
            callback();
        });
        request.write(payload);
        request.end();
    });
}

In the above I substitute in the work item array as a comma-separated list, execute the command as a subprocess, report the result back to the server, and then call the callback. To report the result back I use the http module built-in to Node.JS, but if I were tidy this up I would probably use an npm package like got instead, as it simplifies the code a lot and provides more features / better error handling / etc.

A work item executor is no good without any work to do, so that's what I tackled next. I wrote another function that fetches work items from the server and executes them - wrapping the whole thing in a Promise to make looping it easier later:


function do_work() {
    return new Promise(function(resolve, reject) {
        let request = http.request({
            hostname: settings.server.host,
            port: settings.server.port,
            path: "/",
            method: "GET"
        }, (response) => {
            var body = "";
            response.on("data", (chunk) => body += chunk);
            response.on("end", () => {
                if(body.trim().length == 0) {
                    console.error(`No work item received. We're done!`);
                    process.exit();
                }
                let work_item = body.split(/\s+/).map((item) => parseInt(item.trim()));
                console.log(`[work item] ${work_item}`);
                execute_item(work_item, resolve);
            });
        });
        request.end();
    });
}

Awesome! It's really coming together. Doing just one work item isn't good enough though, so I took it to the next level:

function* do_lots_of_work() {
    while(true) {
        yield do_work();
    }
}

// From https://starbeamrainbowlabs.com/blog/article.php?article=posts/087-Advanced-Generators.html
function run_generator(g) {
    var it = g(), ret;

    (function iterate() {
        ret = it.next();
        ret.value.then(iterate);
    })();
}

run_generator(do_lots_of_work);

Much better. That completed the worker script - so all that remained was to set it going on as many machines as I could get my hands on, sit back, and watch it go :D

I did have some trouble with crashes at the end because there was no work left for them to do, but it didn't take (much) fiddling to figure out where the problem(s) lay.

Each instance of the worker script can max out a single core of a machine, so multiple instances of the worker script are needed per machine in order to fully utilise a single machine's resources. If I ever need to do this again, I'll probably make use of the built-in cluster module to simplify it such that I only need to start a single instance of the worker script per machine instance of 1 for each core.

Come to think of it, it would have looked really cool if I'd done it at University and employed a whole row of machines in a deserted lab doing the crunching - especially since it was for my report....

Liked this post? Got an improvement? Comment below!

Finding the distance to a (finite) line from a point in Javascript

A screenshot of the library I've written. Explanation below.

For a project of mine (which I might post about once it's more stable), I'm going to need a way to find the distance to a point from the mouse cursor to implement an eraser. I've attempted this problem before - but it didn't exactly go to plan. To that end, I decided to implement the algorithm on its own to start with - so that I could debug it properly without all the (numerous) moving parts of the project I'm writing it for getting in the way.

As you may have guessed since you're reading this post, it actually went rather well! Using the C++ implementation on this page as a reference, it didn't take more than an hour or two to get a reasonable implementation working - and it didn't take a huge amount of time to tidy it up into an npm package for everyone to use!

My implementation uses ES6 Modules - so you may need to enable them in about:config or chrome://flags if you haven't already (don't believe the pages online that say you need Firefox / Chrome nightly - it's available in stable, just disabled by default) before taking a look at the demo, which you can find here:

Line Distance Calculator

(Click and drag to draw a line - your distance from it is shown in the top left)

The code behind it is actually quite simple - just rather full of nasty maths that will give you a headache if you try and understand it all at once (I broke it down, which helped). The library exposes multiple methods to detect a point's distance from different kinds of line - one for multi-segmented lines (which I needed in the first place), one for a single (finite) line (which the multi-segmented line employs), and one for a single infinite line - which I implemented first, using this Wikipedia article - before finding that it was buggy because it was for an infinite line (even though the article's name is apparently correct)!

I've written up a usage guide if you're interested in playing around with it yourself.

I've also got another library that I've released recently (also for Nibriboard) that simplifies multi-segmented lines instead of finding the distance to them, which I may post about about soon too!

Update: Looks like I forgot that I've already posted about the other library! You can read about it here: Line Simplification: Visvalingam's Algorithm

Got a question? Wondering why I've gone to the trouble of implementing such an algorithm? Comment below - I'd love to hear your thoughts!

ES6 Features 14: Modules

This is an entry in the ES6 Features series on my blog here. Check out the full series list here.

1 year and 4 months later, and we're finally seeing es6 modules start to land in a browser near you (currently Chrome, Firefox with a flag, Edge 16+, and Safari). Since I've been having to refer back to several different blog posts on the subject at once just to remind myself of a particular aspect of the new syntax, how it's used, and how it interacts with other parts of the syntax, I thought I'd blog about it here.

Before we begin, a note on enabling it in your browser. In Firefox, you need to visit about:config and set dom.moduleScripts.enabled to true instead of false (or create it if it doesn't exist). In Chrome 60, you need to go to about:flags and enable experimental javascript features or some such similar flag. Other browsers may either have it enabled by default, or require a variant on the above to get it to work.

With that, let's look at what it actually is and what it allows us to do that we couldn't before. Have you ever run into this issue before?

<script src="javascript/Vector.js"></script>
<script src="javascript/engine.js"></script>
<script src="javascript/main.js"></script>
<script src="javascript/LineSimplifier.js"></script>
<script src="javascript/Bezier.js"></script>
<script src="javascript/render.js"></script>
<!-- ... -->

It's a bit of a mess, right? Such is the problem with splitting one's code across multiple files in Javascript without a preprocessor such as Browserify or webpack.

Thankfully, it does not have to be this way! It's ES6 modules to the rescue. ES6 modules let us break our code down into discrete components that describe which other components they require. In this way, these components can be found and loaded by the browser on it's own - instead of us having to specify a whole load of <script /> tags and hope we've got them in the right order.

Let's take it from the top. Here's how you tell the browser you're loading a module and not a regular script:

<script type="module" src="./js/index.js"></script>

The above loads the file ./js/index.js as a module. In there, we cna do things like add an onload event listener to the window object to kick things off - in fact you can do practically anything you could in a normal script. Let's take a look inside an example module:

"use strict";

import Vector from "./lib/Vector.js";
import { Banana, Apple } from "./Fruits.js";

window.addEventListener("load", function(event) {
    // ......
});

Referencing another module is done with an import statement. Currently, most browsers require the ./ (or / or even a fully-qualified URL) at the beginning, and don't allow you to drop the file extension like you can in Node.JS - though this may change in the future.

I've given 2 different examples of import statements above - the first one (line #3) imports the default export and assigns it to Vector, and the second one (line #4) imports a pair of specifically named exports.

The next natural question here is how to export things so that we can import them. That's easy too:

export default Pineapple;
export { Apple, Banana, Kiwi as Coconut };
export function travel(start, finish) {
 // ....
}

As you can see, it's quite flexible actually. You can specify a default export with export default ThingName for use with the default import statement above, and you can export specifically named things - and even give them alternate names! Lastly, you can also export things as you define them - like I have with the travel() function above.

That just about covers everything. I'll leave a bunch of links below that go into more depth than I have here. I can already see the endless possibilities with this - I just wonder if anyone's built a preprocessor that concatenates all your modules into one file - whilst maintaining the ability to debug it effectively.... perhaps I'll have to do some research.

Found this useful? Let me know below! I don't currently have any analytics set up, so your comments are the only way I know if anyone's reading this :P

Sources and Further Reading

Line Simplification: Visvalingam's Algorithm

An screenshot of my demo of my implementation of Visvalingam's Algorithm. (Above: A screenshot of the demo of my implementation of Visvalingam's line simplification algorithm. Link below!)

For a secret project of mine I've been working on since about February time (if I recall correctly), I've discovered that I could make some considerable use of a line simplification algorithm. The tricky thing is though that I need an implementation in both Javascript and C♯ - which will both return identical results.

Initially, I chose the Ramer-Douglas-Peucker Algorithm, but I ended up implementing Visvalingam's Algorithm instead, as I encountered issues with calculating the shortest distance from a point to a line reliably along with other algorithmic problems that I determined weren't worth the time to fix.

Visvalingam's algorithm is actually really simple. Suppose we take a line:

A line with 6 points in it.

If we create a sliding window with a width of 3 and slide it along the list of points, then we get a set of triangles. To simplify the line, we can calculate the area of each of these triangles, and remove the centre point of the triangle with the smallest area.

The same line with the triangles highlighted.

The same line with a point removed.

Then we can continue removing the centre point of the smallest triangle until we reach a triangle with an area that's above a threshold we set - and this is Visvalingam's Algorithm.

Though I haven't written the C♯ version yet, I've completed the Javascript implementation - and created a demo for you to play around with! Here's a link:

Visvalingam's Algorithm Demo

Note that you'll need to enable ES6 Module support in your browser to get it to work, as I've used ES6 Modules whilst building it.

In Firefox this can be done by setting dom.moduleScripts.enabled to true in about:config, and in chrome by visiting chrome://flags/#enable-javascript-harmony (sorry, hyperlinks don't work for chrome:// urls IIRC!), enabling it, and restarting your browser.

It's open-source, of course - under the Mozilla Public License 2.0. You can find my code on GitLab - and pull requests are welcome :D

Finally, I've released it as an npm package. If you aren't aware of npm, it's really cool. It's the primary package manager for Javascript - I've written a blog post on this here.

Once I've written the C♯ version I'll have another bash at trying to get Nuget to package it. I think I know what the issue has been so far - so hopefully it works this time! If it does I'll blog about that too.

Found this useful? Think it's cool? Let me know in the comments below!

Forgotten Parallax Bicycles

The forgotten parallax bicycles. In June last year (that feels weird to type), I created another one of my little HTML5 Canvas demos - this time of some hills that parallaxly scroll with a bicycle on a road. I actually made it as a (birthday?) present for someone I seem to remember - and I even released it on my website here, but I somehow seem to have forgotten to post about it here on my blog, so I'm doing so now :-)

You can find it here: Parallax Bicycle

At the time the bicycle itself in particular was incredibly fiddly to get working right if I recall correctly. The hills in the background are procedurally generated too - they are on a (seamless!) loop and repeat every so often. The seamless part was also interesting to get working right.

Transform your javascript with Browserify

Tired of battling endless <script> tags in your html files? Fed up with messing with a dozen libraries cluttering up the place? Can't see the wood from the trees? Try browserify (+ rollupify + wzrd)! It's amazing! It's awesome! It tidies up your code for you, so you don't have to (perhaps not :P)!

Seriously though, I've just been playing around with browserify, and it's awesome. It's that missing thing I've been trying to find for a long time. But what does it actually do, you ask?

Well, perhaps it's best to use an example. Consider these (relatively) harmless javascript files:

// SillySay.js
"use strict";

function sillySay(sentence) {
    // Split the sentence up into words
    var words = splitWords(sentence);

    // Loop over all the words in the above array and display them one by one
    for(let i in words) {
        alert(words[i]);
    }
}
// WordSplitter.js
"use strict";
function splitWords(sentence) {
    // Split the sentence on whitespace and return the resulting array
    return sentence.split(/\s+/g);
}

To use our (perfectly ridiculous) example code, we not only have to include SillySay.js, but WordSplitter.js (this could be a library you use for example) as well:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>
        <meta charset='utf-8' />
        <title>Silly Say Demo</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <p>Silly Say Demo</p>
        <p>By <a href="https://starbeamrainbowlabs.com/">Starbeamrainbowlabs</a></p>

        <!---------------->
        <script src="WordSplitter.js"></script>
        <script src="SillySay.js" charset="utf-8"></script>
        <script>
            window.addEventListener("load", function(event) {
                sillySay("This is a test");
            });
        </script>

        <style>
            html, body { font-size: 100%; }
            body
            {
                font-family: sans-serif;
            }
        </style>
    </head>
</html>

That's looking a bit messy, but imagine what it'd be like if you added another few libraries? Or a new feature in a separate file? See the problem? Browserify solves just this issue. It analyses the dependencies of the entry point to your app, and bundles up all your code into a single file, nice and neat. You can add extra transforms (like plugins), too, to do extra things like automatically insert your app's version, or include other data files automatically, or transpile other languages to javascript automagically (full list here).

Sounds cool yet? Let me give you a quick tutorial on how I set up Browserify, with Rollupify and Wzrd.

Firstly, we need to set things up. If you don't have Node.js installed, do that now. You'll also get npm - Node's (perfectly awesome!) package manager. Next, let's create a quick project and paste in the code above. I've recorded an asciicast (as you may have seen a few times before here) of me going through the process:

(Can't see the asciicast above? Try viewing it here

If you'd like to take a look at the final result, as written in the asciicast above, you can find it over here. Questions and comments are welcome below :-)

ES6 Features 13: Classes

Almost a year ago I finished a series on the new features of Ecmascript 6, the next version of Javascript. At the time there were one or two features remaining that I hadn't covered, but I didn't feel that today's browsers supported them well enough for me to write a blog post on them. Today, however, that has changed, for classes at least. In this blog post I'll explain by example how classes work in ES6.

Originally, I was against the idea of having classes in javascript. After using them for a while, I've decided to change my mind. They can bring organisation to an otherwise rather cluttered project, especially since the modules syntax hasn't yet landed.

If you've you're familiar C♯, then ES6 classes will feel a little bit familiar. Here's a simple example:


"use strict";
class Bicycle
{
    constructor(inPosition, inColour)
    {
        this.pos = inPosition;
        this.colour = inColour;
        this.wheelCount = 2;
        this.setup();
    }

    setup()
    {

    }

    update(dt)
    {
    }

    render(context)
    {
        // Do rendering stuff
    }
}

Very familiar (I hope). Classes in ES6 are defined using the class Tree { } syntax, with everything belonging to that class inside a set of curly braces, just like in C♯. Because javascript isn't a typesafe language, method declarations look a bit different. Essentially they are the same as a C♯ method declaration, just with the type names taken out.

The "use strict"; at the top is important - today's browsers don't let you use classes without it. I'll omit it in later examples for sake of simplicity, but you'll always need to remember to include it when using ES6 classes.

The constructor() method is, as you've probably guessed, the constructor of your class. Strange way of doing things, I know, but that's how it's declared. Note also that all variable initialisation is done in the constructor and not in the class body. Apparently class definitions are supposed to define an object's capabilities and not its members.

Calling a method from inside is an ES6 is easy too (see highlighted line #8), but it's important to understand what the this variable is in this context first (I could write a whole separate blog post about this). this is a special variable in javascript that holds the current context. In the case of an ES6 class, it holds the current instance of the current class. This is identical to C♯, but the difference is that you'd normally never need to use this in C♯ and it's required in ES6 - for both method access and variable access.

class Tree
{
    grow(dt, rate)
    {
        this.classMethodA(4, dt, this.someVariable);
    }

    // ...
}

White noise

Update: It turns out that ES6 does indeed support static methods (but not variables I don't think) natively via the static keyword. Here's an example:


class Tree
{
    constructor()
    {
        this.something = Tree.doComplicatedStuff();
        this.somethingElse = this.constructor.doComplicatedStuff();
    }

    static doComplicatedStuff()
    {
        // ...!
    }
}

Native static methods can be called in two ways (highlighted above). One is practically the same as the C♯ way of doing things, and the other is useful if for whatever reason you don't have the name of your own class handy.

Original sectional text

You can define static variables and methods too, although it's a little bit of a hack. Imagine I have this class:

class NoiseGenerator
{
    constructor()
    {
        // ...!
    }

    GetNoise(amount)
    {
        // ...!
    }
}
Let's pretend that we want all our noise generated with our class to use the same seedable random number generator. How about rand = new MyPRNG();? Or window.rand = new MyPRNG();? Or even this.rand = new MyPRNG()? Unfortunately, all of these methods have at least one problem with them (if you know what's wrong with them, comment down below!). Don't despair though, because we can exploit the fact that classes themselves are objects - and aren't read-only. With this knowledge, we can do something like this:

NoiseGenerator.rand = new MyPRNG(someSeed);
Remember to put the above _after_ the class definition - ES6 classes are a little bit like C++ classes in that they don't exist until the interpreter has executed them (unlike regular old functions). Then in the body of a method, you can access it with something like `NoiseGenerator.rand.nextInt(0, 10);`.

Too many classes

ES6 classes do infact support inheritance under the guise of sub classing. A good example is worth a thousand words I think:

class Vehicle
{
    constructor()
    {
        // ...
    }

    move()
    {
        console.log("Moving vehicle...");
    }

    start() { console.log("Starting..."); }
    stop() { console.log("Stopping."); }
}

class Train extends Vehicle
{
    move()
    {
        super.move();
        console.log("Moving train...");
    }
}

As demonstrated in the example above, classes can inherit from one another with the extends keyword instead of C♯'s colon. The super word replaces the functionality of C♯'s base keyword too. Other than that, there really isn't a lot more to say about inheritance in ES6 besides the fact that almost everything not described works as you'd expect it to in C♯.

That concludes my whirlwind tour of classes in ES6. If I explained in detail every little feature, you'd be here all week reading about it (and I'd be here for the better part of a month writing this post!). ES6 classes also support getters and setters, overriding the default constructor, and more.

Sources and further reading

SnoozeSquad.js - Finally a decent lazy image loader

It's been on my todo list for positively ages, but I've finally gotten around to replacing the existing lazy image loading on this website (not on the blog yet, sorry!) with a new one of my own devising.

Lazy image loading is a technique in which you only load images no a given webpage if they are near the user's field of view. This saves bandwidth by preventing images that are never seen from being downloaded.

Since I've been unable to find a good, solid, reliable lazy image loading script on the web, I thought it best to post about it here so that you can use it too.

Link: SnoozeSquad (Direct download)

Drawing (rotating) shapes

Rotating shapes.

After writing the smooth line class last week I wanted to write another one, and I decided to write a class to aid the drawing regular shapes. While writing the library I found myself with some rather nice looking rotating shapes that I thought would make a good blog post here.

Before I go any further, here's the demo:

See the Pen Rotating shapes by Starbeamrainbowlabs (@sbrl) on CodePen.

The background is a just a set of fancy css3 radial and linear gradients layered on top of one another. The interesting part is the calculating of the points in each shape - let me explain with a hexagon.

Shape drawing explained.

In the above, the hexagon I am drawing is shown in red, and a circle in green. In order to work out the co-ordinates for each corner (or vertex) of the hexagon, we can walk around a circle and note down our location at regular intervals (shown by the blue lines). I learnt this trick from this stack overflow answer. They can explain it much better than I probably could:

Let's assume you want to draw an N-sided polygon of radius r, centred at (0,0). Then the n vertices are given by:

x[n] = r * cos(2*pi*n/N)
y[n] = r * sin(2*pi*n/N)

where 0 <= n < N. Note that cos and sin here are working in radians, not degrees (this is pretty common in most programming languages).

If you want a different centre, then just add the coordinates of the centre point to each (x[n], y[n]). If you want a different orientation, you just need to add a constant angle. So the general form is:

x[n] = r * cos(2*pi*n/N + theta) + x_centre
y[n] = r * sin(2*pi*n/N + theta) + y_centre

By Answerer Avatar Oliver Charlesworth. Source: Stack Overflow

Anyway, here's the code I came up with:

I can't think of anything else I wanted to say, so I think I'll end this post here. Please comment down below if you have anything you want to say :)

Art by Mythdael