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I've got some business cards!

My new business cards!

I've been to several events of various natures now (like the Hardware Meetup), and at each one I've found that a 'business card' or two would be really handy to give to people so that they can remember the address of this website.

After fiddling with the design over about a week I (and Mythdael!) came up with the design you see above. Personally, I'm really pleased with them, so I decided to post here to show them off :-)

I'm finding that it's a rather good idea to promote and build your brand at these kind of events by showing people the cool things that you've created and learnt, and business cards seem to be just the thing that helps you do it.

A close up of the front and back of my new business cards.

Learning Prolog: Lab Session #6 - More Looping

The new learning prolog banner!

Fireworks

Before I get into today's post, I wanted to include a picture of some firework that I managed to photograph a few days ago on my phone. A heard them outside and when I took a look out of the window, this is what I saw!

Anyway, Today's Prolog lab session was about more loops. These loops are different to the failure driven loops that we did last time though in that they are recursive instead. Here's an example:

loopa :-
    write('Enter \'end.\' to exit.'), nl,
    read(Input), (Input = end ; loopa).

The above is a simple rule that keeps asking for user input until the user enters 'end'.

?- loopa.
Enter 'end.' to exit.
|: hello.
Enter 'end.' to exit.
|: cheese.
Enter 'end.' to exit.
|: end.
true.

This is done through the semi colon, which acts as an or operator. Although this works, it isn't very readable. Let's try something else.

% Stopping condition
loopb(end).
% Main loop
loopb(Input) :-
    write('Enter \'end.\' to exit.'),
    read(Input2),
    loopb(Input2).

% Starter rule
go :-
    loopb(something).

Much better. The above is divided up into the stopping condition (i.e. when the user types end), the main loop, and a rule that kicks the rest of the program off. When go is called, we call loopb with something as a parameter immediately. Since this doesn't match the fact loob(end), Prolog looks at the rule we defined, loopb(Input). Then it asks the user for input, and starts the process over again until the user inputs end.

Here's an example of the above in action:

?- go.
Enter 'end.' to exit.gdsfgdrt.
Enter 'end.' to exit.sdfgsdgf.
Enter 'end.' to exit.sdfgsdfgertr.
Enter 'end.' to exit.cheese.
Enter 'end.' to exit.end.
true.

Having learnt this, one of the challenges was to write a rule in Prolog. A factorial is where you multiply an integer by all the integers greater than 0 but less than the integer. For example, 4! (4 factorial) is 4x3x2x1, which is 24). Here's what I came up with:

factorial(1, 1).
factorial(N, Factorial) :-
    N2 is N - 1,
    factorial(N2, Ans),
    Factorial is N * Ans.

And here's an example of the above in action:

?- factorial(6, Answer).
Answer = 720 .

That concludes this post on the 6th Prolog lab session. If you don't understand something (or I've made a mistake!) please post a comment below and I'll do my best to help you. Also, if you have any, post your firework pictures below. I'd be interested to see them!

Art by Mythdael