Starbeamrainbowlabs

About

Hello!

I am a computer science student who is in their third year at Hull University. I started out teaching myself about various web technologies, and then I managed to get a place at University, where I am now. I've done a year in industry too, which I found to be particuarly helpful in learning about the workplace and the world.

I currently know C# + Monogame / XNA (+ WPF), HTML5, CSS3, Javascript (ES6 + Node.js), PHP, C++, and a bit of Python. Oh yeah, and I can use XSLT too.

I love to experiment and learn about new things on a regular basis. You can find some of the things that I've done in the labs and code sections of this website, or on GitHub. My current projects are Pepperminty Wiki, an entire wiki engine in a single file (the source code is spread across multiple files - don't worry!), and a Prolog Visualisation Tool, although the latter is in its very early stages.

I can also be found in a number of other different places around the web. I've compiled a list of the places that I can remember below.

I can be contacted at the email address webmaster at starbeamrainbowlabs dot com. Suggestions, bug reports and constructive criticism are always welcome.

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Latest Post

Android app architecture: First steps and impressions

The android logo.

This post, obviously, is not endorsed by Google or the Android Open-Source Project at all in any way. It's just my attempt to consolidate what I've learnt about it so far.

I've been learning about Android development at University recently - this post is my attempt to consolidate what I've learnt. I'm by no means as confused as I have been in the past at similar stages of a module (take AI and compilers for example, though later on I figured it out). If you notice a mistake, please do let me know by posting a comment below, and I'll correct it.

Note that this post isn't meant to be a complete tutorial on the subject - just to consolidate what you've already learnt (or guide your learning if you're just starting out). I'd recommend taking a course at University, or reading an tutorial on the web on the subject.

Android apps, unlike a regular C or C# program, are made up of one or more activities. They don't have any particular entry point, such as the main method of a C or C# program - instead an activity is selected as the one that should be launched when the user taps the icon on their home screen. Other entry point to the app are possible too - for example services (persistent background processes) and scheduled tasks (broadcast receivers I think). Other apps can even launch your app's activities themselves!

An activity is like a single screen - it's job is to perform a single, focused task. For example a contact list, or a contact details screen.

When an app is launched, a new 'back stack' is created - into which new activities are inserted. It's this mechanism that makes the back button go back to the contacts list from the contact details screen when you press the back button on your phone. Activities can choose to launch an activity in a ne back stack if they want - though I think this only implies to implicit intents (more on these later) that target activities in other apps.

Intents are used to instruct Android as to which child activity a parent activity would like to launch, and to carry data (serialised to a string) around between activities. There are two kinds: implicit and explicit.

Explicit intents are useful when you know the exact name of the intent that you want to launch (their names are like C♯ namespaces I believe). They are most useful when you want to launch another activity that's part of your app (or an extension or your app I suppose).

Implicit intents are used when you know what kind of app you want to launch, but not what it's called. Examples of this include selecting a contact from the address book, opening a URL in a web browser, and pre-filling an email or text message for the user to send.

Fairly simple, right? Unfortunately, this is complicated by 2 things: a large number of Android versions (or API Versions) in use currently (I think Google are working on this long-term), and fragments.

Fragments are like mini-activities. Multiple fragments can be displayed at once, and can be detached / reattached to and from the screen by way of the fragment manager. This is most useful for tablets and other devices with larger screens - An activity can dynamically fetch multiple fragments and display them at the same time. Sticking with the address book / contacts theme, on a tablet one might have the contact list down the left-hand-side of the screen, and the details of the currently selected contact down the right-hand-side of the screen.

The activity is responsible for shuffling messages around between fragments (or other activities) - fragments should be completely self-contained and shouldn't be aware of other fragments that may or may not be displayed at the same time as it is.

From what I can tell, the Android ecosystem has plenty of structure to it. It's (in theory) easy to put together an app even if you haven't written any Java (I can see how Java is said to be C♯'s predecessor) before - especially with the assistance that Android Studio provides, though it does feel somewhat heavy-handed and opinionated at times. I suppose any sufficiently advanced IDE carries considerable risk of being opinionated.

I anticipate, going forwards, that the real problems will start to occur when I start considering compatibility between different Android API versions. Thankfully, I've got experience dealing with web browser compatibility issues, so I'm hoping that Android won't be much more problematic than that - especially since everything appears to be well-documented as to which API versions they were introduced / deprecated in.


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